Gustav FEICHTINGER (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2003



ISBN 978-3-7001-3164-9
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3212-7
Online Edition
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2003  doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2003 
2003  213 Seiten, broschiert, 24x17cm
€  30,00   
     
Open access

In Europe there is currently an increasing public awareness of the importance that demographic trends have in reshaping our societies. Concerns about possible negative consequences of population aging seem to be the major force behind this new interest in demographic research. Demographers have been pointing out the fundamental change in the age composition of European populations and its potentially serious implications for social security schemes for more than two decades but it is only now that the expected retirement of the baby boom generation has come close enough in time to appear on the radar screen of social security planners and political decision makers to be considered a real challenge and not just an academic exercise.

In Austria this new development has motivated the Academy of Sciences to greatly expand and internationalize its Institute of Demography which has been in existence for 25 years. The main idea behind this new effort is the understanding that today demographic analysis only makes sense if it aspires to be at the cutting edge of the international scientific debate. Taken seriously, this aspiration also challenges the traditional organization of demographic research in Europe which still functions largely along national lines although neither demographic knowledge nor demographic trends tend to stop at national boundaries. As a consequence this institute, now known as the Vienna Institute of Demography, sees itself as a European center of excellence in demography, based in Vienna and funded by Austria but not a traditional national institute. Its research is structured into four areas: comparative European demography, population dynamics and forecasting, population economics and analysis of demographic trends in Austria.

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 9050, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at


Contents:
Reprints
Lutz/Sanderson/Scherbov: The end of world population growth; Lutz/Goujon: The world´s changing human capital stock: multi-state population projections by educational attainment; Lee/Schmidt-Dengler/Felderer/Helmenstein: Austrian demography and housing demand: is there a connection?; Lutz/Scherbov/Prskawetz/Dworak/Feichtinger: Population, natural resources, and food security: Lessons from comparing full and reduced-form models; MacKellar: The predicament of population aging: a review essay; Hoem/Prskawetz/Neyer: Autonomy or conservative adjustment? The effect of public policies and educational attainment on third births in Austria; Engelhardt/Trappe/Dronkers: Differences in family policy and intergenerational transmission of divorce: a comparison between the former East and West Germany; Spielauer/Vencatasawmy: FAMSIM: dynamic microsimulation of life course interactions between education, work, partnership formation and birth in Austria, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Sweden; New Articles Buber-Ennser: The influence of the distribution of household and childrearing tasks between men and women on childbearing intentions in Austria; Lutz/Scherbov/Hanika: "Vienna: a city beyond aging" - revisited and revised; Riedel/Hofmarcher: Austrian health expenditures exhibit an age profile

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Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2003
ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition

ISSN 1728-5303
Online Edition

ISBN 978-3-7001-3164-9
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3212-7
Online Edition


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Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2,
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 905-0 Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at
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  Online Edition   Table of Contents 
  Institut für Demographie, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften 
Gustav FEICHTINGER (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2003



ISBN 978-3-7001-3164-9
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-3212-7
Online Edition
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2003  doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2003 
2003  213 Seiten, broschiert, 24x17cm
€  30,00   
     
Open access

In Europe there is currently an increasing public awareness of the importance that demographic trends have in reshaping our societies. Concerns about possible negative consequences of population aging seem to be the major force behind this new interest in demographic research. Demographers have been pointing out the fundamental change in the age composition of European populations and its potentially serious implications for social security schemes for more than two decades but it is only now that the expected retirement of the baby boom generation has come close enough in time to appear on the radar screen of social security planners and political decision makers to be considered a real challenge and not just an academic exercise.

In Austria this new development has motivated the Academy of Sciences to greatly expand and internationalize its Institute of Demography which has been in existence for 25 years. The main idea behind this new effort is the understanding that today demographic analysis only makes sense if it aspires to be at the cutting edge of the international scientific debate. Taken seriously, this aspiration also challenges the traditional organization of demographic research in Europe which still functions largely along national lines although neither demographic knowledge nor demographic trends tend to stop at national boundaries. As a consequence this institute, now known as the Vienna Institute of Demography, sees itself as a European center of excellence in demography, based in Vienna and funded by Austria but not a traditional national institute. Its research is structured into four areas: comparative European demography, population dynamics and forecasting, population economics and analysis of demographic trends in Austria.


Contents:
Reprints
Lutz/Sanderson/Scherbov: The end of world population growth; Lutz/Goujon: The world´s changing human capital stock: multi-state population projections by educational attainment; Lee/Schmidt-Dengler/Felderer/Helmenstein: Austrian demography and housing demand: is there a connection?; Lutz/Scherbov/Prskawetz/Dworak/Feichtinger: Population, natural resources, and food security: Lessons from comparing full and reduced-form models; MacKellar: The predicament of population aging: a review essay; Hoem/Prskawetz/Neyer: Autonomy or conservative adjustment? The effect of public policies and educational attainment on third births in Austria; Engelhardt/Trappe/Dronkers: Differences in family policy and intergenerational transmission of divorce: a comparison between the former East and West Germany; Spielauer/Vencatasawmy: FAMSIM: dynamic microsimulation of life course interactions between education, work, partnership formation and birth in Austria, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Sweden; New Articles Buber-Ennser: The influence of the distribution of household and childrearing tasks between men and women on childbearing intentions in Austria; Lutz/Scherbov/Hanika: "Vienna: a city beyond aging" - revisited and revised; Riedel/Hofmarcher: Austrian health expenditures exhibit an age profile



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Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, +43-1-512 9050, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at