Vienna Institute of Demography (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012



ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7373-1
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7354-0
Online Edition
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2012
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012 
2012,  154 Seiten, 24x17cm, broschiert
€  40,–   
Open access


Introduction
K.S. James, Vegard Skirbekk and Jan Van Bavel: Education and the global fertility transition
Refereed Articles
David Shapiro: Women’s education and fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa
Onipede Wusu: A reassessment of the effects of female education and employment on fertility in Nigeria
Bernhard Nauck and Rokuro Tabuchi: One or two pathways to individual modernity? The effects of education on family formation among women in Japan and Germany
Albert Esteve, Jeroen Spijker, Tim Riffe and Joan García: Spousal and parental roles among female student populations in 55 low- and middle- income countries
Valeria Bordone and Daniela Weber: Number of children and cognitive abilities in later life
Jan Van Bavel: The reversal of gender inequality in education, union formation and fertility in Europe

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
https://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at

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Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012
ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7373-1
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7354-0
Online Edition



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doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2012s9


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Thema: journals
Vienna Institute of Demography (Ed.)


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012



ISSN 1728-4414
Print Edition
ISSN 1728-5305
Online Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7373-1
Print Edition
ISBN 978-3-7001-7354-0
Online Edition
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2012
Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012 
2012,  154 Seiten, 24x17cm, broschiert
€  40,–   
Open access


David Shapiro
PDF Icon  Women’s education and fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa ()
S.  9 - 30
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2012s9

Open access

Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften

Abstract:
Sub-Saharan Africa was the last major part of the developing world to experiencefertility decline, and fertility in the region remains high compared to fertility inAsia and Latin America. Correspondingly, women’s education, known to be animportant factor related to fertility via multiple pathways, is comparatively low inthe region. Numerous studies have documented the importance of increasingwomen’s education as a key variable contributing to fertility decline in thedeveloping world. This paper uses aggregated data to examine the role ofincreasing women’s educational attainment in the ongoing fertility transition insub-Saharan Africa, in conjunction with other socioeconomic changes such asdeclining infant and child mortality and changes in economic well-being. Inaddition, detailed patterns of fertility differences by educational attainment arealso examined across countries using individual-level data, highlighting thesignificant role in fertility transition of increasing secondary and higher education.

Published Online:  2013/01/16 08:02:54
Object Identifier:  0xc1aa5576 0x002d6897

Introduction
K.S. James, Vegard Skirbekk and Jan Van Bavel: Education and the global fertility transition
Refereed Articles
David Shapiro: Women’s education and fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa
Onipede Wusu: A reassessment of the effects of female education and employment on fertility in Nigeria
Bernhard Nauck and Rokuro Tabuchi: One or two pathways to individual modernity? The effects of education on family formation among women in Japan and Germany
Albert Esteve, Jeroen Spijker, Tim Riffe and Joan García: Spousal and parental roles among female student populations in 55 low- and middle- income countries
Valeria Bordone and Daniela Weber: Number of children and cognitive abilities in later life
Jan Van Bavel: The reversal of gender inequality in education, union formation and fertility in Europe

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Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Austrian Academy of Sciences Press
A-1011 Wien, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2
Tel. +43-1-515 81/DW 3402-3406, Fax +43-1-515 81/DW 3400
https://verlag.oeaw.ac.at, e-mail: verlag@oeaw.ac.at